Gold in the Wolds

We took an impromptu trip to the Yorkshire Wolds last bank holiday weekend. I was drawn in by the Hockney paintings and features on Countryfile. We decided that we’d tackle the awful weather by cheering ourselves up with some lovely countryside and top food.

We were staying not too far from the pleasant town of Beverley so a trip to the Michelin starred Pipe and Glass was obligatory. Because it was a bank holiday weekend the gastro pub had very odd opening hours, meaning we could only go at lunchtime. This was fine, however our Bed and breakfast (the very glamorous Kilham Hall) served one of the most tasty and substantial breakfasts I have experienced in a long time so I was not entirely sure that I was ready for yet more rich food. You’ll be pleased to know that I soldiered on!

The Pipe and Glass, South Dalton, East Yorkshire

The Pipe and Glass is in the picturesque village of South Dalton and is very quaint and idyllic itself. Inside it is a maze of well renovated rooms. The decor is quite simple, but clean, cosy and full of comforting dark and warm colours. We had a lovely and roomy gnarled wooden table that was in the main restaurant. The pub has operated in its current guise since 2006 and is the proud owner of East Yorkshire’s one and only Michelin star.

The menu was full of good British classics, using local Wolds ingredients. We opted to avoid starters to optimistically have room for a pudding. I went for the roast rump of lamb, with summer vegetables, crispy mutton belly and crushed heritage potatoes. The lamb was soft and pink and was cooked in a tongue tingling mint glaze that gave the meal a really fresh hit, rather than being rich and cloying. The crispy mutton belly was heaven – like a substantial piece of salty crackling. The veg were nice and crunchy and again helped to lift a potentially heavy dish. Richard went for the fish cakes which were huge and fluffy. We can’t remember what fish it was and annoyingly the menu I brought home with me does not list them! I can, however, confirm that the cakes were accompanied by a tasty smoked mackerel and potato salad. They were both hearty portions, so we were glad that we’d avoided starters! Other dishes that came out also looked good. Of note was the three onion and goats cheese tart – a lovely summery dish that came with pretty roasted beets. Also, another fish dish (the halibut I think) was served to make it look like the fish was jumping out of water. It smelled good and looked like lots of fun!

Roast rump of lamb

We just about had room for pud, and we both went for the classic sticky toffee pudding. It was as you would expect for a decent STP – dark and fluffy sponge with lashings of sticky, caramel sauce. It was served with a stout ice cream, which was subtle but you could still get some of the stout’s smokiness if you really tried. Atop the ice cream was a walnut brittle which gave some great texture and chewiness. To the side of the pudding came a fun little beer glass of stout. I got to have Richard’s too as he’s not a fan of proper beer! All in all it rounded off a good meal.

Sticky toffee pudding with stout ice cream

I don’t know what I was expecting from the Pipe and Glass. I think I probably entered feeling a bit complacent about it all, because of its excellent reputation. A pub can be gastro, and a gastro pub can have a Michelin star, but ultimately they will always still be pubs and I wonder if this can limit how good they can be? Therefore I think because of this my expectations were lower than they should have been. As it happens the food was of a high standard, tasty and faultless. The service was professional and attentive and our surroundings were extremely pleasant. I will certainly go back for a full evening meal next time and explore the ales some more. The Pipe and Glass have confirmed for me that they deserve the good reputation that they have and this has put my faith back in the gastro pub.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s